CfP: Setting Forth At Dawn, Workshop on the Geopolitics and Practices of Writing and Publishing in Africa, 16 – 20 May 2016, Jimma, Ethiopia, Deadline: 25 January 2016

For all those academics, authors and writers on the African continent:

“There is a considerable body of critical work on, in, and from Africa and with African perspectives. However, too often intersecting material, ideological, linguistic, financial, and political circumstances exclude African knowledges from global or transnational knowledge exchanges. A global academic publication gap and the unequal “right to research” (Appadurai 2006) that establishes the hegemony of Anglophone scholars based in the North—(and with it, the assumption of expertise for policy-making and socio-economic projections)—is a persistent continuation of post/coloniality.

The intricately intersecting barriers of language, geography, politics, place, epistemology, and ontology create and intensify these uneven geographies of global publication. Scholars on the continent face political and economic barriers, including, for example, strict travel restrictions in the racialized global political economy, or assiduous coloniality (Mignolo 2011). The publication gap has the effect of silencing southern epistemologies and ontological commitments and reinforcing the domination of Euro-American-based epistemologies, ontologies, and critical theories. The geopolitics of knowledge creation—who creates knowledge, from which spaces, with which theoretical perspectives, and for which political ends—remains uneven and unequal across gendered, racialized, linguistic, and geographical lines.”

Setting Forth At Dawn

A Workshop on the

Geopolitics and Practices of Writing and Publishing in Africa 

16 – 20 May 2016 / 8 -12 Genbot 2008

Hosted by the

College of Law & Governance

in collaboration with the

Office of the Vice President for Research & Community Services

Jimma University, ጅማ Ethiopia

Jimma-University

aquotesBackground & Rational

There is a considerable body of critical work on, in, and from Africa and with African perspectives. However, too often intersecting material, ideological, linguistic, financial, and political circumstances exclude African knowledges from global or transnational knowledge exchanges. A global academic publication gap and the unequal “right to research” (Appadurai 2006) that establishes the hegemony of Anglophone scholars based in the North—(and with it, the assumption of expertise for policy-making and socio-economic projections)—is a persistent continuation of post/coloniality.

The intricately intersecting barriers of language, geography, politics, place, epistemology, and ontology create and intensify these uneven geographies of…

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